Our Blog - Page 2 of 8 - DSM Spine + Sport

Plantar Fasciitis

Dr. Brooks Newton Articles

Virtually every runner has experienced or knows of someone that has experienced the dreaded plantar fasciitis. Even if you’re not a runner, you’ve likely know of plantar fasciitis as it is the #1 cause of heel pain. Read More


French Gymnast Breaks Leg

Dr. Brooks Newton Articles


Heel Raises for Achilles Pain

Dr. Jon Roed Articles

Repetitive strain and stress injuries are some of the most common found in runners. Achilles heel pain can come from this overuse, it often effects other athletes as well.

The repetitive stretching of the achilles tendon which happens with running, can be worsened by weak calf muscles.

Strengthening the major calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) can help prevent future heel pain, and also help heal current achilles tendon pain via fibroblast stimulation (you don’t need to remember that last part).

Take a look at this week’s video:

At Des Moines Spine+Sport we utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. We have no interest in making life long patients. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to allow our patients to live pain free.

#GETBETTERFASTER #DESTROYPAIN #LIVEPAINFREE


Supine Glute Bridge for Back Pain

Dr. Jon Roed Articles

Over the past four years of practice, Dr. Brooks and I have taken the time to help inform/educate past patients, friends and colleagues through an online video series we’ve called Movement Monday. The goal of this series is to provide you with an increased knowledge of yourself, your body, and ways to eliminate any pain you are experiencing. We do this because helping others achieve health is our passion, and we have an exceptional capability to help those with musculoskeletal complaints (pain and injury to the muscles and joints of the body).

This week we address low back pain and demonstrate an at home exercise for you to perform.

***On a side note, we are having a Low Back Pain and Sciatica Workshop coming up on August 3rd! For a FREE advanced ticket, sign up HERE.***

Mechanical low back pain is one of the most common causes of visits to physicians, in the U.S. (Mechanical means the back pain is caused by improper function of the of the muscles and joints of the low back and hips.)

A large part of this improper function comes from muscle imbalances (some muscles are over used and others under used)

To eliminate pain, it is important to train the correct muscles to fire/activate.

A supine glute bridge is an excellent exercise that can prevent and reduce low back pain. Take a look at the video where Dr. Brooks and I walk you and talk you through the specifics of the Glute Bridge.

In this exercise, abdominal and pelvic muscles stabilize the lumbar spine while proper hip hinge mechanics are also taught (teaching the lower body to move without moving the back too much).

Movement Tips:

  • Remember, the focus is on quality muscle contractions. You want to feel this movement as much as possible in the glutes and hamstrings.
  • Consistency is important to ensure ‘muscle memory’ occurs. Do multiple sets of 20-30 repetitions.

 

 

At Des Moines Spine+Sport we utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. We have no interest in making life long patients. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to allow our patients to live pain free.

#GETBETTERFASTER #DESTROYPAIN #LIVEPAINFREE


5 Tips to Prevent Running Injuries

Dr. Jon Roed Articles

In just a few days more than 8,000 runners will lineup to run the Dam to Dam with another 3,000 runners joining the event to do the 5K on June 4. This event is a benchmark for runners of all levels, in Des Moines, as it starts the unofficial running season so many have been training for.

Photo: John Barnhart

Photo: John Barnhart

Training for a road race event can be grueling. No matter if you are a beginner or advanced runner, putting in miles and miles over hard pavement can add up. Below I have outlined some tips to give runners a leg up on preventing some common running injuries. Take a look!

1. Shin Splints

The easiest way to avoid shin splints is to increase mileage gradually. Also, when you start running, it is good to have the appropriate shoe fitted especially for your feet. Whether you are a natural supinator (have high arches) or over-pronator sometimes referred to as “flat feet.” Beginners can benefit from a professional fitting at local running shoe stores. We recommend local running stores like Fleet Feet, Kyle’s Bikes, or Fitness Sports.

At the first sign of shin pain, start with a day of rest, use ice, and self massage/foam rolling. It is also a good idea to start reducing your running to a more comfortable level for a few days, then slowly increase your mileage. I recommend cutting your current mileage in half for one week. Another option is to switch up your exercise routine by adding in biking, yoga or swimming to reduce strain on the affected tissues.

Below are a couple of recommend exercises that help prevent shin splints:

Exercise 1:

Statically stretch your calves one at a time by rising up on a step, on the ball of your foot, and then lowering yourself down, being sure to keep your knee straight.  Hold for 30 seconds do 3 sets each side.

Exercise 2:

Sit on the floor with your bare foot extended out in front of you. Hold a wide light resistance band in each hand, curl your toes into the band as you point your foot. Repeat daily, 3 sets of 20

2. Runners Knee

The best way that you can prevent runners knee by using proper running technique and form. Record yourself running and you may notice imperfections with your form or you can find a running coach to help retrain yourself, perfect your form to avoid other injuries.

Sometimes runners forget the importance of strength training. Including this into your training routine will not only build the condition of your muscles but also assist in preventing injuries. If you suffer from runner’s knee symptoms, focus your strength training on your quadriceps muscles and glutes.

Below is a recommended resistance band exercises to help you gain flexibility and relieve pain:

Exercise 1:

Place a loop of resistance band just above your ankles or your knees. Separate your feet and bend your knees, lowering down into a slightly crouched position/athletic stance. While staying in this position, take 10 to 15 sidesteps, keeping your feet straight and your upper body still. Then reverse directions. Keep your feet separated to maintain band tension. You should feel your glute muscles working.

3. Achilles Tendonitis/Tendinosis

At the first sign of achilles pain, begin with rest. This is not an injury that you should try and run through. If you catch it early, a minor irritation may only take a few days to heal but if you keep running, the injury can become severe taking months to heal.

The main cause of achilles tendinitis is repetitive stress on shortened tissue.  High volume athletes like distance runners are susceptible to it, due to the shear number if strides they take while training.

Preventing achilles tendonitis starts with your warm up and stretching. This is something to put priority on and is meant to warm your muscles before starting your run. Your warm up should be at least 8 minutes. Below are some warm up recommended routines:

Start with a gradual walk to increase blood flow and move into a jog. Once your heart rate is increased. Work in some dynamic stretches like “toy-soldiers” and “tea-kettles.” Glute-kicks and high knees are effective as well. Lateral movement like shuffling side to side for several strides will help warm up your hips as well.

Additionally, runners should get accustomed to using a foam roller to help the lower leg muscles maintain their proper length and function. I recommend a post run rolling routine that takes 2 minutes for each mile that you ran that day. Example: if you ran 8 miles, use your roller for 16 minutes after the run.

4. Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS)

Even though the pain is usually felt on the outside of the knee, iliotibial band syndrome is correlated with the improper facilitation of the true hip extensor muscles such as gluteus maximus and the dysfunction of gluteus medius.

Just like any injury, the best prevention is warming up adequately before a run, stretching before and after, and listening to your body at the first sign up injury. Once the injury is diagnosed soft tissue work and icing of the symptomatic area can be beneficial. The soft tissue work can be done by a professional or some by self massage with a foam roller. Below I have outlined just one example of how to use the foam roller:

Lie sideways on the foam roller with it under your thigh. Using your body weight to apply pressure roll lengthwise in the soft part of your hip next to where your jeans pocket would be. Be careful to avoid the boney prominences of you knee and hip as they will be tender and could cause some irritation.  Roll with focus on the effected hip approximately 5 minutes a day.

5. Stress Fracture

If you have ever had a stress fracture, you are at greater risk to have one again. In fact, sixty percent of athletes who have sustained a stress fracture have had one previously. Stress fractures are more common in women than men. They can occur in the foot, shin or neck of the femur.

A stress fracture isn’t something you can just run through, if you get a stress fracture, you can expect to take eight to sixteen weeks off from running. The greatest way to ensure you don’t get a stress fracture is prevention. Make sure you listen to your body, don’t start training too intense or too quick and consider enlisting help from a professional to reach your running goals.

I hope you are able to get out and participate in the Dam to Dam this weekend.  It is important to be conscious of the most common injuries runners encounter and to take precautions as necessary to stay fit and healthy this running season!  If you suspect you have one of these conditions be sure to reach out to Dr. Brooks or myself for a consultation. Use the link below to schedule:

www.dsmspinesport.com/appointment-request

Happy running, and we hope to see you out there!

Photo: John Barnhart


Neck Pain & Headaches – Suboccipital Muscles

Dr. Jon Roed Articles

The majority of cranial movement happens at the occiput (base of skull) and the top two segments of your cervical spine. This area can be put under lots of undue tension when subject to poor posture and anterior head carriage. When this area becomes stressed and “beat-up” from overuse, the base of your skull can become a very bothersome, as neck pain and headaches ensue.

The main group of muscles which become affected, are the suboccipital group:

  • Rectus capitis posterior major/minor
  • Obilquus capitis superior/inferior

Neck Pain & Headaches - Suboccipital Muscles

Check out this week’s Movement Monday video, to help address this short and constricted muscle group.

At Des Moines Spine+Sport it is our mission to provide speedy pain relief for the patients of the Urbandale and greater Des Moines area. We utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to destroy pain which allows our patients to live pain free.


Neck pain due to forward head position

Dr. Jon Roed Articles

The cervical spine is designed to have a natural lordotic curve. However, many people develop a loss of this natural curve due to poor posture and bad head positioning throughout the day. When this loss of curve happens, stress is transferred to incorrect areas, which may lead to pain.

Two of the muscles which play a part in pulling the neck into a forward position are the scalene group, and the sternocleidomastoid (SCM).

Check out this week’s Movement Monday video to help address these short and constricted muscle groups.

At Des Moines Spine+Sport it is our mission to provide speedy pain relief for the patients of the Urbandale and greater Des Moines area. We utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to destroy pain which allows our patients to live pain free.


Low back pain and thoracic rotation

Dr. Brooks Newton Articles

In this week’s Movement Monday video we’re taking a look at the the thoracic spine and it’s connection with low back pain….AGAIN.

Last week we talked about how the thoracic spine can have a direct correlation with low back pain.

When moving adequately, the T-spine is designed to extend and rotate.

Activities such as prolonged sitting can wreck havoc on the thoracic spine.

At Des Moines Spine and Sport we are utilize chiropractic and physical medicine principles to address thoracic spine mobility dysfunction which can be correlated with low back pain.

Thoracic spine flexion

 

When the T-spine is unable to rotate, the body will find rotation elsewhere.

When rotation takes place at the lumbar spine (low back) is susceptible to injury and low back pain will often times follow.

Check out this week’s Movement Monday video where we outline two strategies for improving thoracic spine rotation.

Enjoy!!

At Des Moines Spine+Sport it is our mission to provide speedy pain relief for the patients of the Urbandale and greater Des Moines area. We utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to destroy pain which allows our patients to live pain free.


Low Back Pain and Thoracic Mobility

Dr. Brooks Newton Articles , , , ,
At Des Moines Spine and Sport we are utilize chiropractic and physical medicine principles to address thoracic spine mobility dysfunction which can be correlated with low back pain.

Thoracic Spine

In this week’s Movement Monday video we’re taking a look at the the thoracic spine and it’s connection with low back pain.

The thoracic spine, otherwise known as the mid or upper back is made up of twelve vertebrae (T1 through T12). It sits between the cervical (neck) and the lumbar spine (low back) and articulates with the ribs laterally. Normally, the T-spine will have a subtle curvature, known as a kyphotic angle that ranges between 20 – 45 degrees.

Thoracic spine function can have a direct correlation with low back pain.

When moving appropriately, the T-spine should have the ability to extend and rotate. Many activities of daily living can take their toll on T-spine function. Sitting is one the prime culprits. With prolonged sitting, the T-Spine commonly loses its ability to be move, specifically in extension and rotation.

When the T-spine misses extension and rotation, the body will often times find extension and rotation elsewhere. When too much extension takes place at the lumbar spine low back pain will often follow.

Thoracic spine flexion

Thoracic spine flexion

Check out this week’s Movement Monday video where I outline two strategies for improving thoracic spine extension.

  • T-spine Foam Roller Fulcrum Extensions
  • Kneeling Pull-throughs

Enjoy!!


At Des Moines Spine+Sport it is our mission to provide speedy pain relief for the patients of the Urbandale and greater Des Moines area. We utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to destroy pain which allows our patients to live pain free.


Low back pain – Glute Bridge

Dr. Brooks Newton Articles , , , , ,

Over the last few week’s, we’ve highlighted a number of strategies to implement for low back pain. We’re continuing with that theme in this week’s Movement Monday video.

This week’s Movement Monday video takes a look at a dynamic stability exercise – The Glute Bridge.

Urbandale chiropractor outlines a glute bridge for low back pain.

Our patients experiencing low back pain typically display deficits in one of four areas:

  1. Hip mobility
  2. Abdominal stability (Core strength, abdominal facilitation, etc.)
  3. Thoracic spine mobility
  4. Dynamic neuromuscular control

The Glute Bridge is a great way to train both abdominal stability as well as some dynamic neuromuscular control.

Take a look at this week’s Movement Monday video where Jon and I walk you and talk you through the specifics of the Glute Bridge.

At Des Moines Spine+Sport we utilize cutting-edge chiropractic and physical medicine practices to allow our patients to get better faster. We strive to destroy pain and facilitate function as quickly as we can. We have no interest in making life long patients. Through the use of hands-on techniques we are able to destroy pain which allows our patients to live pain free.

#GETBETTERFASTER #DESTROYPAIN #LIVEPAINFREE